The setting: Sculpture for a good cause


Shane Hansen (Tainui, Ngāti Mahanga, Ngāti Hine, of Chinese, Danish and Scottish descent) presents Te Tūi Kaitiaki, inspired by his guardian, the tūī.

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Shane Hansen (Tainui, Ngāti Mahanga, Ngāti Hine, of Chinese, Danish and Scottish descent) presents Te Tūi Kaitiaki, inspired by his guardian, the tūī.

In his weekly column on art, Nadine Rubin Nathan traces the topography of the artistic scene of Aotearoa. This week, she discovers sculptures that have found a digital platform, for a good cause.

Sally Lush’s artistic practice encompasses large abstract paintings and outdoor installations, often with mirrors.

But in recent years, his creative efforts have mainly focused on organizing sculpture exhibitions, such as the 2014 and 2016 Harbourview Sculpture Trail, in which 40 works were exhibited around the salt marshes and lakes of the Te Atatū peninsula in Auckland.

In 2019, she was chosen to host the 2020 New Zealand Sculpture OnShore exhibition, the largest outdoor sculpture exhibition in the country, but she became a victim of Covid and was canceled.

Cluster Concept # 005 by Max Patté is a playful flight of glowing orbs that seem to float skyward (left).  Jin Ling (right), known for her life-size ceramic works depicting women at peace, was commissioned by Lush to create Reader for the exhibition.

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Cluster Concept # 005 by Max Patté is a playful flight of glowing orbs that seem to float skyward (left). Jin Ling (right), known for her life-size ceramic works depicting women at peace, was commissioned by Lush to create Reader for the exhibition.

Then the 2021 NZ Sculpture OnShore exhibit – now in its 25th year – also seemed doomed due to the uncertainty surrounding Auckland’s alert levels.

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Covid restrictions have impacted supply chains and lockdowns have affected artists’ ability to access their studios, fabrication shops, bronze casting foundries and simply made art making difficult. But they have rotated and so it happens in a different form: numerically.

“Our amazing team, including generous volunteers, quickly came together to pivot online and build a website capable of selling artwork within six weeks,” Lush tells me.

“It is also a true tribute to the dedication, perseverance and resilience of artists. “

This gave NZ Sculpture OnShore – which typically attracts 20,000 visitors, most of them from Auckland – the opportunity to reach art lovers from across the country and even the world for an online experience with over 200 sculptures. .

Of course, this is a compromise solution, and Lush must first admit that it is far from the experience of being on site, immersed in the facilities of the O Peretu Fort Takapuna Historical Reserve on the coast. north of Auckland with its spectacular clifftop panorama overlooking Rangitoto and the Hauraki Gulf.

But it still happens in this form, as all proceeds from sales at the online exhibit go to Kids in the Middle, an initiative to create safe and creative spaces for children staying in each of the 40 Safe Homes. of the Women’s Refuge. Since their inception, the exhibits have raised over $ 2.1 million for Women’s Refuge.

Even online, this year’s show has already surpassed its goal of $ 100,000, having sold the work for the highest price in the show’s history.

At $ 94,000, Max Patté’s Cluster Concept # 005 is a playful flight of glowing orbs that seem to float skyward.

“Some of the most successful works in terms of sales this year are also bronze works,” Lush explains. “It was a nice surprise, as many of them are editions and can be sold multiple times. “

Showcasing works by established and emerging artists, including monumental stand-alone sculptures, domestic and small-scale works, ephemeral projects, sound and light works of art, and numerous site-specific installations, some relate to the cause, while others are ordered as site- specific works.

Jin Ling is known for her life-size ceramic works depicting women at peace. Lush commissioned Ling to create Reader for the exhibition.

Structure I of the House of Parliament by artist Taranaki Chauncey Flay is made up of sculpted pieces of Takaka marble removed during the hive reinforcement during the earthquake and balanced on top of each other in a modernist style.

Self-taught artist of international collection Shane Hansen (Tainui, Ngāti Mahanga, Ngāti Hine, of Chinese, Danish and Scottish descent) presents Te Tūi Kaitiaki, inspired by its guardian, the tūī; while Fiona Garlick, well known for her large bronze and medallion works, presents Off Balance, a bronze and bluestone piece that we can all relate to after this year.

For more information visit www.nzsculptureonshore.co.nz until November 28.


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